Why Do Artists Draw Distorted Bodies?

Regina Ionescu

Regina Ionescu

Visual Arts Teacher at Fauritori Association
She holds an MFA in Art Education from the National University of Arts in Bucharest and participated in group exhibitions at M.N.A.C, The Arck Gallery, Aiurart Gallery and Victoria Art Center.
Regina Ionescu
Distorted bodies in art:  ten ways to understand distortions of the human form in art.
1. It’s a way to grow stronger.
Pheidias - Centaur and Lapith , metope from the Parthenon
Pheidias – Centaur and Lapith , metope from the Parthenon, British Museum, London
2. It’s a way to see all the movie in one second.
Umberto Boccioni - Charge of the lancers (1915)
Umberto Boccioni – Charge of the lancers (1915), Museo del Novecento, Milan
3. It’s a lesson in empathy.
Frida Kahlo - The Wounded Deer
Frida Kahlo – The Wounded Deer, Collection of Carolyn Farb Houston, Texas, U.S.A.
4. It’s about creating new forms of life.
Jason Hopkins - Monster, human reconfiguration
Jason Hopkins – Human Reconfiguration III
5. It’s a chance to reorganize yourself.
05_Magrit
Rene Magritte – La Folie des Grandeurs, 1961
6. A new way to measure feelings.
picasso_+Weeping+Woman
Pablo Picasso – Weeping Woman
7. It’s a way to get close to someone.
Pablo Picasso - Head of a Woman (1960)
Pablo Picasso – Head of a Woman (1960)
8. Artists are too big for this small world.
Salvador Dali - Sleep 1937
Salvador Dali – Sleep 1937
9. It’s a replacement for sound.
EdvardMunch - The Scream
Edvard Munch – The Scream
10. The way to achieve perfection.
Venus of Willendorf  – c. 30000-25000 BC

Regina Ionescu

Visual Art Teacher at Fauritori Association, Group shows at M.N.A.C, The Arck Gallery, Aiurart Gallery, Victoria Art Center. Masteral Studies in Fine Arts and Art Pedagogy, National Art University Bucharest, Fine Arts Faculty, Photo Video and Computerized Image Processing department.

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